Dr. Jeff Iverson is an honors graduate who graduated first in his class and scored 99/100 on his board exam, at the University of Kentucky School of Dentistry where he received first-rate training in all aspects of general dentistry.  He then attended graduate school at the University of Texas-Houston where he received his masters degree in the speciality of orthodontics.  Dr. Iverson is a board certified orthodontist.

Through a combination of state of the art technology, sensible treatment plans and genuine devotion to the unique needs of each patient Dr. Jeff Iverson preserves healthy teeth and gums, and improves the appearance of smiles on a daily basis. He has applied his unique blend of artistic and technical skill to correct the malocclusions in thousands of patients. Dr. Iverson is a young orthodontist with a grasp of the most innovative, minimally invasive new procedures, Dr. Iverson is dedicated to lifelong learning through his participation in continuing education courses.

Dr. Jeff Iverson is a professor at the University of Utah School of Dentistry where he teaches craniofacial development and orthodontics.

Dr. Jeff Iverson is licensed by the Dental Board of Utah and is a member of the American Dental Association, Utah Dental Association, American Association of Orthodontics,  American Orthodontic Foundation, Utah Association of Orthodontists and the American Board of Orthodontists.



There's nothing quite like a beautiful smile.
Riverton Crossing Medical Center 12391 S 4000 W #212
What Teeth Look Like 
This is the front view of a normal dental occlusion with all of the adult teeth in their proper positions.  This picture was taken the day Dr. Iverson removed the braces which is why their is some slight redness in the patients gums.
This is a right side view of a normal dental occlusion with all of the adult teeth in their proper positions.  This picture was taken the day Dr. Iverson removed the braces which is why their is some slight redness in the patients gums.
Normal Dental Occlusion Age 12+
Normal Dental Occlusion Age 7-12
This is the front view of what is referred to as a mixed dental occlusion.  At the age between 7-12 patients have both adult and baby teeth present. 
This is the right side view of what is referred to as a mixed dental occlusion.  At the age between 7-12 patients have both adult and baby teeth present. 
This is the same right side view as above.  The baby teeth have been marked with red dots.  All of the other teeth are adult permanent teeth.
The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that every child have a orthodontic screening and x-ray to identify potential developmental problems by the age of 8 years old. We at Iverson Orthodontics understand the importance of providing this service and offer a complimentary consultation and x-ray not only to our younger patients but to all our new patients of any age.

Phase One Orthodontic Treatment

Some patients require braces at an earlier age than other patients.  If a patient receives orthodontic treatment between the ages of 6 and 12 the treatment is typically referred to as phase one treatment.  Phase one treatment is limited orthodontic treatment with specific limited goals to correct problems in younger patients.  Patients at this age are in a mixed dentition which means that the patients have a mixture of adult and baby teeth.  Phase one treatment only addresses problems with the adult teeth that are present which means patients will need to be evaluated around the age of 11-12 once the remaining baby teeth are lost to see if full braces are necessary (Phase two).   Phase one treatment usually lasts for a period of about 4 - 12 months at which time the braces are removed and the patient is given a retainer to wear in between phase one and phase two treatment.

When is Phase One Orthodontic Treatment Necessary?
1.  Crossbites.  A crossbite occurs when the top teeth bite inside the bottom teeth.  This causes a traumatic occlusion on  the teeth which causes the teeth to wear down in an abnormal way.  This wear causes permanent damage to the adult and the baby teeth.  Cross bites can also cause asymmetric growth due to patients posturing their jaws in abnormal ways in order to allow their teeth to come together. 
 
Side view of posterior crossbite in the mixed dentition.  (mouse over to see completed)
Front view of posterior crossbite in the mixed dentition.  (mouse over to see completed)
Front view of an full anterior crossbite in the mixed dentition.  (mouse over to see completed)
Front view of a partial anterior crossbite in the mixed dentition.
Crossbite Treatment

Crossbites are typically treated with a combination of fixed partial braces and expansion.  Total treatment time is typically between 4 - 8 months.
What are expanders?
There are many different types of orthodontic expanders that are used to correct posterior crossbites.  The picture to the right shows a Hyrax expander which is an example of a typical orthodontic expander.  The Expander  has a screw in the middle that is turned once a day which makes the upper jaw wider by putting a gentle but firm force across the palate as shown here. The palate widens through the maxillary suture which is still fairly flexible until all of the patients growth is complete.



2.  Crowding / abnormal eruption of adult teeth / missing teeth.  During the ages of 7 -12 most patients will loose all of their baby teeth. These baby teeth will usually be replaced by the patient's adult teeth unless the adult tooth is missing.  During this time of dental transition many problems can occur such as adult teeth not having enough room to come in or an adult tooth erupting in an abnormal way which can cause permanent damage to adjacent teeth.  Many of these problems if caught early can be corrected before the problems become worse. 

Red Flags for Parents to Look for: 

1)  Front baby teeth DO NOT have any spaces in between them.  

  • At or around age 6 - 8 the front baby teeth will fall out and the adult teeth will start to come in.  The Adult teeth will be larger than the baby teeth so if the baby teeth don't have spaces between them you can expect that the adult teeth won't have enough room.

2)  An adult tooth comes in only on one side and not on the other. 

  • Adult teeth will usually come in symmetrically on each side within a few months of each other.

3) A baby tooth is lost prematurely due to trauma or decay.

  • Baby teeth hold space while they are in place.  If a baby tooth is lost prematurely space   loss can occur which will cause problems later when the adult teeth come in.

4) An adult tooth starts to erupt in an abnormal position.

  • This is a good indication of crowding and/or abnormal eruption of the adult teeth.
3) Asymmetric growth of either the upper jaw or the lower jaw.  This can best be described as an underbite or overbite.  The orthodontist has to take an x-ray to diagnosis how the patient is growing to determine if phase one treatment is necessary due to an asymmetric growth pattern. 
Front view of an patient in an underbite due to excessive lower jaw growth.
Front view of an patient in an overbite due to excessive upper jaw growth.
Underbite
Overbite
Full Orthodontic Treatment 
Full Orthodontic treatment can sometimes be referred to as Phase Two Orthodontic Treatment.  It is referred to as Phase Two Orthodontic treatment if the patient has previously undergone Phase One Orthodontic Treatment.  Usually if a patient has undergone Phase One Treatment the Phase Two treatment is for a shorter duration but can vary due to the complexity of the patient's care.

  There are many benefits of orthodontic treatment including:

1)  Improved oral hygiene due to an increased ability to clean between the corrected           overlapping teeth.
2)  Longevity of the teeth is increased due to the elimination of traumatic occlusion               and abnormal wear on the teeth.
3)  Patient's have and increased capacity to chew their food when their teeth fit                      properly which can cause less strain's on the jaw joints and teeth.
4)  Healthier bone and gum support around teeth minimizing tooth loss at later age.
5)  Improved speech sounds due to the fact that many of the sounds are created by                having the tongue touch the back surface of the upper teeth.
6)  Improved self esteem.
7)  More esthetic and pleasing smile.

There are many reasons to undergo Full Orthodontic Treatment here are just a few examples of some common dental problems.

Openbite
This is an example of a patient that is in a openbite.  An open bite occurs whenever the top teeth and the bottom teeth do not touch each other which causes stress on the teeth and jaw joint.
Deepbite
This is an example of a patient that is in a deepbite.  An deep bite occurs whenever the top teeth excessively overlap the bottom teeth.  This causes wear to the opposing dentition and permanent damage to the teeth.
Crossbite
This is an example of a patient that is in a crossbite in the adult dentition.  A crossbite occurs when the top teeth bite inside the bottom teeth.  This causes abnormal wear on the teeth and can cause jaw joint strain.  Orthognathic Surgery may be required to correct crossbites if treated as an adult.
(Mouse over to see treated)
(Mouse over to see treated)
(Mouse over to see treated)
(Mouse over to see treated)
Generalized Spacing
This is an example of a patient that has Generalized Spacing.  Spaces or gaps in the teeth can be unaesthetic and can cause abnormal occlusions.
(Mouse over to see treated)
Generalized Crowding
(Mouse over to see treated)
This is an example of a patient that has Generalized Crowding.  Crowding can cause hygiene problems and can cause teeth to wear down abnormally.  If the crowding is sever it may be necessary to remove adult teeth to correct the crowded teeth.
Underbite
This is an example of a patient that has an abnormally erupting tooth.  You can see the tooth erupting high which can cause many problems to the tooth and the adjacent teeth.
Impacted and abnormally erupting teeth
Overbite
(Mouse over to see treated)
(Mouse over to see treated)
This is an example of a patient that has an underbite. An underbite occurs when the upper teeth bite behind the lower teeth.  This can be due to many factors including abnormal growth.  Orthognathic Surgery may be required in adults to correct the  malocclusion.
This is an example of a patient that has an overbite. An overbite occurs when the upper teeth excessively overlap the lower teeth and the lower teeth are set back in relation to the upper teeth.  This can be due to many factors including abnormal growth.  Orthognathic Surgery may be required in adults to correct the  malocclusion.
Midline asymmetry
(Mouse over to see treated)
This is an example of a patient that has missing teeth.  In this patients case we were able to substitute the upper canines for the two missing front teeth.  Substitution like this is not always available but when it can be done it can be a good treatment option.
Limited Orthodontic Treatment 

Limited Orthodontic Treatment can be a good alternative to correct minor tooth problems.  Patients that have Limited orthodontic treatment only have braces placed on a few teeth.  The treatment is not comprehensive and has specific goals and the treatment time is shorter ranging between 3 - 12 months.   
Missing Teeth
This is an example of a patient that had crowding in the lower incisors which is very common.  The patient wore limited braces on just the lower front teeth and treatment was completed in just under 4 months.
Limited Orthodontic Treatment
This is an example of a patient that has an midline asymmetry.  A midline asymmetry is when the middle of the upper teeth is shifted to either side of the middle of the lower teeth.  A midline asymmetry has multiple causes and can cause trauma along with abnormal wear upon the teeth.
Before
Before
After
After
This is the patient at the completion of their limited orthodontics.  The patient was placed in a permanent lower retainer on the lower front teeth after the braces were removed as shown here.